Facebook posts with Hubspot landing pages getting flagged as 'against Facebook community standards'

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sspangler
Participant

Has anyone been having the issue of posts containing Hubspot landing page links getting flagged as 'Against community standards' on Facebook, and subsequently being removed? This seems to be a new issue, but we can no longer publish posts containing a link to a Hubspot landing page without it being removed. I'm unable to talk to an actual person at Facebook about it–it's definitely on the Facebook side and not Hubspot though. 

1 Accepted solution

Accepted Solutions
Jaimee
Solution
Participant

Hey, 

 

Is the following any help: 

 

  1. Do the landing page and Facebook Ad match? In other words, when they see your ad and click to the landing page, does it have the same type of language, similar colors, and the same vibe? Bait and switch is a no go so my tip is to write your landing page copy and then pull pieces of it into your ad so it feels like a seamless experience.
  2. No exit pops anymore. It used to be you could get away with a non-intrusive exit pop, but better safe than sorry. Make it a CLICK to pop instead and be sure your buttons and/or images have clear “Click Here” messages so your traffic knows what to do.
  3. Facebook copyright infringement. If you use the word Facebook, make sure it’s capitalized and has the ™ after it (on a Mac it’s option 2). Do not use ANY of the images or icons associated with Facebook, nor include it in any of your free or paid offers. I would just stay away from the word altogether but it’s unavoidable sometimes.
  4. Money-Making claims are dead to Facebook. It used to be that you could AT LEAST say “I made x amount of dollars in 30 days”…and as long as you weren’t promising the same for your viewer, you were good. NOT ANYMORE (I’m overusing the all caps in this blog post, but I want you to PAY ATTENTION!). Now you can’t even say you made a million dollars in five weeks, even if it’s true. You still can say you made a million dollars *supposedly* but I’m steering clear of any claims like this, for good. It stands to note I had NO time limits on my landing page and I was still banned. Get creative and try to figure out ways to describe wealth without saying the obvious.
  5. Info-products must be described, sold, and advertised like physical products. Here’s what I mean — when you’re giving away a digital product on a landing page, it’s a little more intangible. That’s why your landing page should be as CLEAR as possible. Exact features, deliverables, etc. Webinars are the worst culprits of this vagueness and getting the smack down faster than any other type. Even though curiosity is a hallmark of direct response copy, it shouldn’t have classic bait and switch type headlines “You’ll never believe what happens when you do THIS”.
  6. Stop using excessive amounts of “you”, “you’re”, “this”, and “other”. These are words that Facebook is looking for because of high use in clickbait headlines. When you’re writing a draft copy of your ad or landing page, read it back and see if you can change the you’s to I’s.
  7. Disclaimers EVERYWHERE. If you’re advertising a webinar, you must disclose that there will be an offer at the end. I would do it in the ad and in the landing page at the bottom. I would also put any disclaimers you have about results, income claims, etc. In other words, cover your butt. When you do so, Facebook feels better.
  8. Privacy policy, terms of use, address, phone number, the blood type of your firstborn child. Okay not that last one. But think about real big companies. They have ALL these things, and phone numbers especially carry a level of credibility. So add all of that to your footer. Get a google number if you’re not comfortable using a business or personal line.
  9. Custom domain. For the love of all things good and right, just get a custom domain. Even though there is no actual ban on the default clickfunnels domain, you want to give yourself the best chance at success so a custom domain is a sign of stability and credibility as a business owner. Also, it’s better to hook the domain INTO Clickfunnels than to use say a WP plugin since the load time of the page can be slower with the second model and page speed matters to Facebook a lot!
  10. Health people need to watch their language too. This means weight loss claims, using the word diet, and the before and after pictures. When you want to talk about losing weight, say something like “Ready to fit in your high school little black dress again?” Dust off your thesaurus and use words that Facebook won’t immediately flag.
  11. Bridge funnels are your friend. Sometimes what you want to advertise is just NOT gonna fly. Especially if you’re a marketer who’s teaching people how to make money. So consider a bridge funnel in front of your REAL one. Give away a physical product, or at least a more tangible info-product (in other words, not a webinar) and make it clear it’s a digital downloadable book or guide or report. THEN, re-route them on the thank you page and through email to your webinar training.

These are just a few of the ways you can help your landing page stay compliant. It may be obvious but it warrants saying…write clear and convincing copy with no spelling errors, spend time on the design, think about how you would feel if you clicked on an ad and landed on the page. Would you be impressed or annoyed? Negative feedback on an ad after a poor user experience is the fastest way to get banned.

 

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3 Replies 3
Jaimee
Solution
Participant

Hey, 

 

Is the following any help: 

 

  1. Do the landing page and Facebook Ad match? In other words, when they see your ad and click to the landing page, does it have the same type of language, similar colors, and the same vibe? Bait and switch is a no go so my tip is to write your landing page copy and then pull pieces of it into your ad so it feels like a seamless experience.
  2. No exit pops anymore. It used to be you could get away with a non-intrusive exit pop, but better safe than sorry. Make it a CLICK to pop instead and be sure your buttons and/or images have clear “Click Here” messages so your traffic knows what to do.
  3. Facebook copyright infringement. If you use the word Facebook, make sure it’s capitalized and has the ™ after it (on a Mac it’s option 2). Do not use ANY of the images or icons associated with Facebook, nor include it in any of your free or paid offers. I would just stay away from the word altogether but it’s unavoidable sometimes.
  4. Money-Making claims are dead to Facebook. It used to be that you could AT LEAST say “I made x amount of dollars in 30 days”…and as long as you weren’t promising the same for your viewer, you were good. NOT ANYMORE (I’m overusing the all caps in this blog post, but I want you to PAY ATTENTION!). Now you can’t even say you made a million dollars in five weeks, even if it’s true. You still can say you made a million dollars *supposedly* but I’m steering clear of any claims like this, for good. It stands to note I had NO time limits on my landing page and I was still banned. Get creative and try to figure out ways to describe wealth without saying the obvious.
  5. Info-products must be described, sold, and advertised like physical products. Here’s what I mean — when you’re giving away a digital product on a landing page, it’s a little more intangible. That’s why your landing page should be as CLEAR as possible. Exact features, deliverables, etc. Webinars are the worst culprits of this vagueness and getting the smack down faster than any other type. Even though curiosity is a hallmark of direct response copy, it shouldn’t have classic bait and switch type headlines “You’ll never believe what happens when you do THIS”.
  6. Stop using excessive amounts of “you”, “you’re”, “this”, and “other”. These are words that Facebook is looking for because of high use in clickbait headlines. When you’re writing a draft copy of your ad or landing page, read it back and see if you can change the you’s to I’s.
  7. Disclaimers EVERYWHERE. If you’re advertising a webinar, you must disclose that there will be an offer at the end. I would do it in the ad and in the landing page at the bottom. I would also put any disclaimers you have about results, income claims, etc. In other words, cover your butt. When you do so, Facebook feels better.
  8. Privacy policy, terms of use, address, phone number, the blood type of your firstborn child. Okay not that last one. But think about real big companies. They have ALL these things, and phone numbers especially carry a level of credibility. So add all of that to your footer. Get a google number if you’re not comfortable using a business or personal line.
  9. Custom domain. For the love of all things good and right, just get a custom domain. Even though there is no actual ban on the default clickfunnels domain, you want to give yourself the best chance at success so a custom domain is a sign of stability and credibility as a business owner. Also, it’s better to hook the domain INTO Clickfunnels than to use say a WP plugin since the load time of the page can be slower with the second model and page speed matters to Facebook a lot!
  10. Health people need to watch their language too. This means weight loss claims, using the word diet, and the before and after pictures. When you want to talk about losing weight, say something like “Ready to fit in your high school little black dress again?” Dust off your thesaurus and use words that Facebook won’t immediately flag.
  11. Bridge funnels are your friend. Sometimes what you want to advertise is just NOT gonna fly. Especially if you’re a marketer who’s teaching people how to make money. So consider a bridge funnel in front of your REAL one. Give away a physical product, or at least a more tangible info-product (in other words, not a webinar) and make it clear it’s a digital downloadable book or guide or report. THEN, re-route them on the thank you page and through email to your webinar training.

These are just a few of the ways you can help your landing page stay compliant. It may be obvious but it warrants saying…write clear and convincing copy with no spelling errors, spend time on the design, think about how you would feel if you clicked on an ad and landed on the page. Would you be impressed or annoyed? Negative feedback on an ad after a poor user experience is the fastest way to get banned.

 

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sspangler
Participant

Thank you so much for the thoughtful post, @Jaimee! I did have one question—do all of these tips apply to regular, non-ad Facebook posts as well?

None of the posts I had created were through ads and were just regular Facebook posts, as we've always done in the past. I've only noticed them getting taken down in the past couple of weeks. Thanks!

bendonahower
Top Contributor | Platinum Partner

This is also coming up more frequently for me. 

 

> Client yesterday couldn't post to IG directly

> Client last week couldn't post to FB through HubSpot

 

These links aren't violating FB guidelines. 

 

It's likely not HubSpot related as I'm seeing community violations on HubSpot subdomains domains and non-HubSpot pages on root domains unless it's connected to the tracking script. 

 

Alas, FB/IG provides very very little guidance on what exactly the issue is and how to troubleshoot it and even less support.

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