4 Tips for Collecting More Meaningful Design Feedback

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HubSpot Product Team

1) State the goal of the project.

 

Feedback needs to solve a problem or service an end-goal. Include a summary of the project that includes:

 

  • The target audience
  • The problem this project is meant to solve
  • The desired action viewers should take after seeing the project
  • The emotion the project should evoke
  • What can’t be changed

 

2) Limit the options.

 

Too many options can create confusion for reviewers, compromising their ability to focus one one concept and it’s goal. If you need to, present two to three different options and highlight how they are different and why they will solve the main problem in a distinct way.



3) Provide data to support your decisions and present the design as a part of the bigger marketing plan.

 

If you can support your decisions based on improved user experience, performance, conversions, and feedback from the target audience, you’ll have an easier time conveying the context of the project and justifying your strategy.

 

4) Ask specific questions.

 

To get actionable feedback that goes beyond the “I like it” or “I don’t like it”, ask questions that will provide you with insights into why the design doesn’t impress the client or why they think changes are necessary. Here are a few sample questions to get you started:

 

  • What is memorable about the design?
  • What type of person would this design appeal to?
  • At what point did you get “bored” or feel uninterested?
  • What could be removed to make this more simple?
  • What features are missing that are absolutely necessary?
  • What is unclear or confusing?
  • What problem do you think this design solves?
Hannah
1 Reply 1
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HubSpot Alumni

@hannah wrote:

 

4) Ask specific questions.

 

To get actionable feedback that goes beyond the “I like it” or “I don’t like it”, ask questions that will provide you with insights into why the design doesn’t impress the client or why they think changes are necessary. Here are a few sample questions to get you started:

 This is my favorite tip in this post. I like to start by user testing (either recorded or watching real-time) to see where the problems are. I've found that I'm able to quickly uncover why something is confusing or not working well by seeing it in action! That ensures that I ask the most meaningful follow up questions.

 

Does anyone have any questions that they always ask to add to this list?

Best,
Angela | HubSpot Academy