when to use a form vs a landing page

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Occasional Contributor

Hi there, 
I'm having an issue understanding the difference between a landing page and a form, and when to use them. My implementation is using a wordpress integration, where the site is running. Is there any benefit to using a hubspot landing page with a form, over a Wordpress "page" with an embedded hubspot form? 

 

 

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@elcapitan - There's not really a right or wrong answer here.  Personally speaking, I use other analytics platforms for all web reporting regardless of where it is hosted, in my current case it's Google Analytics. The reason for this is to create a single source of truth.  If you have different platforms reporting on different numbers it can sometimes be difficult to share this value, but by having a uniform reporting system, it can help relate apples to apples instead of trying to compare a Red Delicious to a Granny Smith.  So while the reporting is has similarities it's not necessarily exact.  

 

With regards to Form reporting, I would typically rely more on Hubspot because that is the database capturing the leads - regardless of whether you use the javascript embed or host the form on a Hubspot landing page. If you are using the iframe Hubspot code, or if you are using a Wordpress form processor like Ninja Forms, Gravity Forms, Contact Form 7, etc. then I would recommend the an outside analytics platform like a Google Analytics Event tracking because if the form does not live natively on the page through their code, then I would be concerned with losing a level of reporting that would tell me what page someone submitted the form from for instance. This is because an iframe is a URL that is different from what is in the browser so since the form is not on the page, there is not an easy way (without scripting) to determine what page the visitor was on when they submitted the form.

 

At the end of the day though it's about what you are more comfortable with because they are both tools designed to help you understand what's going on to create and help build the ever-changing story of the customer journey.  

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A landing page and a form are completely different.  The landing page is a page where you will advertise your call to action (CTA) and luse analytics to see how well your content is driving conversions.  The form is the object on the landing page (or website page) that actually does the conversion.  A conversion cannot take place without a form or other information gathering source as this is what allows a prospect to move from unknown visitor to a known prospect (or qualified lead depending on your SLA between Marketing and Sales organizations).

 

To the second question of when to use a Landing Page (Hubspot / subdomain / etc) vs. using your website (www - regardless of where it is hosted) - that is a business decision that from my experience, most businesses struggle with.  This all comes down to separation of reporting and how you want to analyze what you setup.  So, first and foremost, there should be Hubspot forms integrated or embedded within your Wordpress site.  For example Contact Forms or Demo Forms.  From there the water gets really muddy. When I worked with clients in the past, I would usually recommend that key pages and form stick to your website and campaigns that you need to track separately go into your automation platform.  One of the key drivers for this was that it was typically easier for Marketing to edit in the automation platform (and usually had more freedom to do so) then the CMS which was usually owned by IT and came with more restrictions and less flexibility with building templates that could be edited with a less-technical understanding.  This is not always the case, but definitely something I can across often in my experience.

 

So the short answer is, there is no right or wrong to what you are asking, more of what are the limitations and advantages of each and figuring out what works best in your given situation.

Occasional Contributor

Thank you for the detailed response, Ben.

 

Can you elaborate on what the differences between using an automation platform vs. CMS with a hubspot form from an analytics perspective? Does hubspot's hosted landing pages, with an embedded form offer different (better?) analytics than a form embedded on a page hosted in a CMS, like Wordpress? 

At the moment, our implementation is on the small side. IT and Marketing are a department of one, so we're not bound by departmental constraints. 

 

Thanks, 

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Advisor

@elcapitan - There's not really a right or wrong answer here.  Personally speaking, I use other analytics platforms for all web reporting regardless of where it is hosted, in my current case it's Google Analytics. The reason for this is to create a single source of truth.  If you have different platforms reporting on different numbers it can sometimes be difficult to share this value, but by having a uniform reporting system, it can help relate apples to apples instead of trying to compare a Red Delicious to a Granny Smith.  So while the reporting is has similarities it's not necessarily exact.  

 

With regards to Form reporting, I would typically rely more on Hubspot because that is the database capturing the leads - regardless of whether you use the javascript embed or host the form on a Hubspot landing page. If you are using the iframe Hubspot code, or if you are using a Wordpress form processor like Ninja Forms, Gravity Forms, Contact Form 7, etc. then I would recommend the an outside analytics platform like a Google Analytics Event tracking because if the form does not live natively on the page through their code, then I would be concerned with losing a level of reporting that would tell me what page someone submitted the form from for instance. This is because an iframe is a URL that is different from what is in the browser so since the form is not on the page, there is not an easy way (without scripting) to determine what page the visitor was on when they submitted the form.

 

At the end of the day though it's about what you are more comfortable with because they are both tools designed to help you understand what's going on to create and help build the ever-changing story of the customer journey.  

Occasional Contributor

Thanks Ben, 

This has been very informative, and helpful. 

I appreciate the detailed insight you have provided. It has given us a direction to pursue. 

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