How does tracking individual user behaviour affect GDPR?

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Occasional Contributor

Most web analytics are anonymous and aggregated. But tracking a user's actions in HubSpot allows you to build up a history of pages viewed, buttons clicked etc for a named individual (as soon as they fill in any form).

 

Is it recommended to highlight this in privacy policies?

 

Has anyone got experience or advice whether this is considered by consumers as more permission than simple anonymous/aggregated analytics? If yes it would imply a separate opt-in.

 

Can action/interaction data be provided easily to individuals on request (as is now their legal right)?

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Community Manager
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Occasional Contributor

Thanks - to clarify my question, it's to ask whether HubSpot and the community generally are highlighting the collection and storage of individuals' data from event and page view analytics tracking under their GDPR opt-in.

 

When people click "I agree" to a cookie notice on entering a website, probably most would understand the idea that their page views and interactions are tracked in web analytics.

 

However most web analytics are anonymous and aggregated data.

 

In the case of HubSpot and similar systems, past website interaction behaviour becomes de-anonymized when it is attached to a contact (after the first form fill).

 

Is the user aware of this? Probably not.

My question is whether we should not only make the user aware of it but ask permission.

 

Form GDPR tends to focus on opting in to receiving marketing email. Should we add some clearer wording to explain about tracking and storage of individually identified web browsing history?

 

 

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