Attract Masterclass and Case Study Questions

cpieri
HubSpot Employee

Have any questions about this masterclass and case study? This is the place to post them!

 

We'll be sourcing answers to our questions from our instructor as well as various experts across HubSpot and other organizations. As such, it may take some time to answer every question, although we aim to answer them all as soon as possible.

53 Replies 53
Inaygia
Member
I have a physical product that solves a solution no one is searching for. What type of things can I do to attract traffic to my site? Like the class said tying your brand into related search terms was good to do. But I’m at a loss on how to actually do this as it’s not a SAAS. Help.
KateTilbury
Member

Hi Inaygia,

 

I'm a fellow participant so perhaps someone with more knowledge than me will come in, but I also have a physical product, and also one that not a huge number of people are doing google searches for 😄 !

 

We haven't yet used SEO to attract a lot of people as we need to build a better backlinks strategy frankly, but we've been using paid ads to "attract" on facebook.  For Google organic and paid I plan to use terms related to the current solution.  Have you ever hear of the terms "pains" - "gains" - "workarounds"?  i.e. What's the problem with the current offering, what the benefit of your product (your 10x to quote the video) and finally what's the "workaround" i.e. what are people for whom the current solution is not acceptable doing instead?  No. 1 and No. 3 here might give you some search terms.

 

What's your product?  Maybe if I know more I or someone else can contribute more to help!

Inaygia
Member
Hi Kate,

My product is custom organic makeup. The problem we are solving is matching all skin tones. Our solution is custom and DIY options.

I saw the recording for the q&a but I’m not sure what chunking up really means.

What I gathered from the answer in the recording is that I should start with the fact that people don’t know they have this problem. But in my case, people are very well aware that they have this problem. And in light of recent events more companies are aware of this lack of shades problem.

So where do I go from here? My potential customers know there’s a problem and that it affects them. How do I chunk lateral or chunk up or both to draw people in? Ideas?
kawtar
Participant

Hi Kate,

You can make interviews with people who they have this skin problems and give them the solution ,a short promotional video and then publish it in social media youtube,facebook instagram...

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Dip
Member

What are the first 5 first actions to take?

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PhilipSmith
Member

My business model is targeting both paid and unpaid users that are separate audiences

but both are crucial to the business model to be functional and profitable. My unpaid users are individuals 20-25 and my paid users are SMEs.

 

Should I focus more on attracting my paid users?

 

The business model is only functional if both audiences engage and I am trying to plan how best to attract both separately and at a balanced pace as they will engage with each other.

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cpieri
HubSpot Employee

Hey @PhilipSmith! Mind describing in a bit more detail how the two sets of users interact to create success for your brand? That will better help me advise you on this.

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CAAus
Member
One of the key parts of any marketing strategy is to understand your customer. By doing this, you can specifically segment and create tailored marketing to these customers - creating the customer persona.

Not sure if this is a tricky question or not. I work in education and one one of my arms is the B2C market. We use advanced analytics to understand and predict student learning requirements. Our end user is the student, as they need to to do the work but is our customer the parent as they are the ones forking out the $$ for the product?

Generally the parent does not know until the student is falling behind until it's too late. So back to creating a customer persona - is this created on the parent or the student (or both).

Challenges us that if it is the student, isn't it extremely difficult to market to the student?

Thoughts?
Sinna
Member

HiCAAus

My company is in education for K 12 ( tutoring) for 15 years biut in the past 2 years  we are developing an evidence based assessment system with the same purpose as you have mentioned...We may have similar issues...Can we connect via email or whats app for a zoom call sometime?

 

Whatsapp +6597537753  email : sinna@sgeduacademy.com

Cheers 
Sinna

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cpieri
HubSpot Employee

Hey @CAAus!

 

Typically when we think about the establishing our customer persona, we think of it as the person who will actually be using the product or asking for the product as opposed to the person who is actually paying for it. While you will want content for the person who is paying that will make them feel confident in the product they are purchasing, this typically is not 'Top of the funnel' content, more of a sales enablement tool to nudge someone along once they have already started to consider purchasing.

 

When you are thinking about attracting people to your brand, from your description it seems like the people you want to be attracting are the students. As such, the types of topic clusters and content you produce should be oriented to this student, who it sounds like is trying to leverage your tool to get ahead or keep from falling behind.

 

As far as marketing to the student, it can be harder because they tend to purchase at much lower rates (although if the motion here is for a parent purchase this may not be as much of a factor). It also can be harder, because they tend to consume content in very different ways than people in the working world would. They use different platforms (TikTok vs Instagram vs Facebook) and their actual content can look very different than what we might be used to. As such, when going after this audience it can be super helpful to conduct surveys (they can often be quite cheap online) or have a small sampling of people within the target demographic that are willing to be interviewed periodically.

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donovanw
Contributor

When building your customer story and focusing on whats changed in the world etc., how do you choose whats most relevant? How do you determine its relevancy and if it will remain relevant? I want to avoid choosing something to develop a story around that customers care about now, but may not care about in 6 months.

cpieri
HubSpot Employee

Hey @donovanw!

 

This is a great question, I'll pose it to the experts during the live AMA tomorrow but here are some thoughts in the meantime.

 

Spending all the time during covid19 investing in a strategy that is solely focused on topics that are relevant right now is a risky strategy as your audience might dry up when things go back to 'normal.' That being said, a lot of the ways you might typically engage with or find an audience are no longer relevant or buried under a lot of other noise. Swaying too far in one camp or the other might have negative consequences in the long term. 

 

My suggestion would be to spend some time investigating which parts of your brand story resonate now and have resonated historically. Typically, the best way to go about this is using a tool like Google Trends or Ahrefs that allows you to look at the historical traffic around a given topic or search term. This will allow you see what kind of priorities folks have right now as well as had in the past. That way you can spend time investing in a customer story that doesn't seem tone-deaf right now but also has some historical weight behind it. 

donovanw
Contributor

Hey @cpieri  thanks for the response. It definitely helps. Being in the real estate industry I definitely think there are a number of stories I can build my brand around. Many of them I've gotten from customer discovery. Just want to make sure its long lasting and impactful. Looking forward to the live session!


@cpieri wrote:

Hey @donovanw!

 

This is a great question, I'll pose it to the experts during the live AMA tomorrow but here are some thoughts in the meantime.

 

Spending all the time during covid19 investing in a strategy that is solely focused on topics that are relevant right now is a risky strategy as your audience might dry up when things go back to 'normal.' That being said, a lot of the ways you might typically engage with or find an audience are no longer relevant or buried under a lot of other noise. Swaying too far in one camp or the other might have negative consequences in the long term. 

 

My suggestion would be to spend some time investigating which parts of your brand story resonate now and have resonated historically. Typically, the best way to go about this is using a tool like Google Trends or Ahrefs that allows you to look at the historical traffic around a given topic or search term. This will allow you see what kind of priorities folks have right now as well as had in the past. That way you can spend time investing in a customer story that doesn't seem tone-deaf right now but also has some historical weight behind it. 


 

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jennnickols
Participant

It sounded like when you are planning your content clusters you used keywords as your guide to decide on the content.  Can you give some more details or practical steps about how you take your story, create the content pillar and then decide on the clusters?

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cpieri
HubSpot Employee

Hey @jennnickols!

 

Awesome question, this is one of my favorite things to do in marketing these days. Planning your content strategy involves a balance of discovering what is relevant for your brand, what is attainable SEO wise, and what kind of things people are searching for. The way we do this is through something called a Search Insights Report. 

 

I'm happy to explain it in more detail but I actually thing it will be more valuable to direct you to the courses/content we have created with Search Insights Reports experts at HubSpot. This is an amazing resource that will walk you through what a Search Insights Report is in more detail as well as specifically how to create one yourself.

 

If this is not quite what you are looking for and I'm misunderstanding your question please let me know!

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jennnickols
Participant

I think this is exactly what I'm circling around.  Just how all the pieces work together instead of them just being individual piece.  I will definitely look into these.

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nvakaliuk
Contributor
Hi, Carl, thanks for sharing the Insights Report. Does it cover also a short-tail and long-tail keywords and which one is better to use in blogposts? I suppose it is very important especially when it comes to competition of a startup with an established company with a longer presence on the market. 
 
Thanks in advance. 
Nataly
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cpieri
HubSpot Employee

Hey @nvakaliuk! So it does get into that a bit, but the Search Insights Report is also a bit of a different way to thinking about getting traffic. Given that short tail keywords have much more traffic than long term keywords (in general), creating a search insights report is generally about finding short tail keywords that are not oversaturated, and you have a real opportunity to gain authority on. This happens through creating content specific to that term as well as the terms that surround this (often longer tail keywords). I highly recommend checking out the course (it's not too long), and I'd be more than happy to get a bit more specific in helping you create yours specifically!

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JohnB2
Member

Hi,

 

I am in a market (software sales) where the existing distribution channels hold great power. The alternative, where you are selling directly to the ultimate customer, is a slower route to market but may be the only available route for startups. 

 

If we do sell through the existing distribution channels, should the buyer persona(s) be created for the distributor or for the ultimate buyer? 

 

Thanks

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cpieri
HubSpot Employee

Hey @JohnB2!

 

Great question! If you are selling through a distribution channel, the buyer persona will still be the ultimate buyer. Depending on your distribution channel, you may need some content/enablement resources in order to get listed/promoted within an existing distribution channel, but the large majority of your content (particularly that early-stage, attract content) is oriented towards the ultimate buyer.

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DR16
Participant

We have a SaaS product that solves the top 3 pain points for attorneys, who is our target audience that would pay for the software. The other target market, potential clients, get a lot of great benefits, too.

 

The trick is conveying the benefits to each target market succinctly without sounding like total marketing-speak. 

 

Content, social, SEO is all good by target market. But the top statement is the hardest one!

 

 

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cpieri
HubSpot Employee

Hey @DR16!

 

Conveying a large or complex offering (particularly when you have two personas) in a succint manner is an age-old struggle in marketing and something that can take time to figure out (some people never get it right!). It's tough to give advice without understanding where you currently are on this.

 

Mind telling me what you are currently using to serve this need and the benefits you are hoping to convey to each market? From there I can do my best to help you figure this out! Feel free to DM me if youd like.

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chromabill
Contributor

I really loved the workshop this week for attracting customers.

 

I learned a tremendous amount about engaging with customers,  building out our customer acquisition strategy, market research, distribution playbooks, and defining key metrics to measure our goals.

 

I even took it one step further and defined the 10x for Chromabill. 

 

Our10X.png

 

 

Some key questions:

1. We’ve been running ads for the past quarter and have found that we have a strong male audience. How do you suggest we market differently so we have higher conversion rates for women?

 

2. In order to be an expert on our customers, we have to understand where they are coming from. Is there a way I can efficiently track exactly where our customers found us from without needing to ask them?

 

3. What are some great incentives for referrals we can implement without having to lose out on profits such as free months of service per referral? 

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cpieri
HubSpot Employee

Hey @chromabill!

 

I love it! You're 10x looks great! I'm glad to hear you enjoyed the session 🙂

 

To answer your questions: 

 

1. From our ads experts at HubSpot: most ad platforms allow you to target gender, so one option could be for them to run one campaign for women and one campaign for men - that way the spend is evenly distributed. Some followup questions on this however: are you seeing your ads spends skew automatically towards men or are you seeing the conversion rates and performance is better for men?  Are you trying to increase spend and volume for women, or are you trying to improve the performance such as CVR and CPA for women compared to men? With these answers @chromabill, I can get more accurate answers for you!

 

2. Identifying the source of your customers and proving ROI is an age-old problem when it comes to marketing. The good news is that with digital marketing this has improved significantly from where it once was. The bad news is that digital data is very segmented so it can be tricky to identify this effectively. The most direct answer to your question is that you will likely need to invest in a tool that can provide some level of source data or attribution data. Tools I'd recommend include Bizible, Google Analytics, or even HubSpot now has attribution reporting in our Enterprise tier. The tricky thing about attribution data however is that it typically can only measure your contacts as far back as their first interaction with your brand (and their source for that interaction) but does not capture all the interactions with your brand that might occur outside of this (word of mouth, referrals, blog posts, articles, etc). As such, it may be necessary to ask your customers where they are coming from in order to make sure you are getting the full picture. To make this less of a burden on our customers, one thing I do is periodically add a question into our signup flow that asks our customers how they found our brand/product. We don't have this question running all the time, but just occasionally so we can monitor any changes in trends and action them approriately. 

 

3. Great question! There are two ways to think about referral bonuses: what the brand who is cashing in on the referral wants and what the actual person who is cashing in on the referral wants. While the brand may want free months of software or upgrades, the actual person cashing in the referral is more likely to want gift cards, cash, presents, etc. Typically something like an Amazon or Visa gift card or a 'choose your own present' site such as this is a good option. You also have the option to build a more constant referral community where participants can earn points that they cash in when they want to. If you are hoping to built a customer advocacy community, here is an article I wrote last year that might be able to help you out.

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chromabill
Contributor

@cpieri Hi Carl ! Thank you for the compliments! These workshops have been extremely insightful and incredibly invaluable to our team, especially now more than ever since we're launching July 1st. Even this week, I'm already learning a tremendous amount on how to go-to-market! This accelerator is perfectly aligned with our launch date. 

 

Thank you so much for taking the time to answer my questions! I really appreciate it. 

 

1. (Thanks for having your ad experts look into this!) I think that's a great idea. I'm going to do some experiments on running a few different A/B targeted campaigns for different genders to see how they play out. We've been running a few Instagram ads for the past Quarter in 2020 and our Fb Ads Manager has shown these results. We've only spent around $500 since most of the costs have been on the actual product development for the MVP buildout. However, these are the results that we have gotten. 

 

Screen Shot 2020-06-23 at 2.39.51 PM.png

 

It seems like all the ads spend do skew towards men ($412) meaning that more men are engaging with the content.  We want to increase the spending up to and following our launch but we ideally want to try to achieve a solid 50/50 split between the genders so that we have a good engagement with both. @cpieri 

 

2. So for this question, we currently are using Wix for our landing page since their customization options are so easy to use and they provide notifications for each visitor on our site. They do have their own attribution data, see photo below:

Screen Shot 2020-06-23 at 2.49.32 PM.png

 

but I think you make a solid point that we should engage with our customers and find out where they're coming from. Especially for metrics like WOM which is harder to track. We are using Intercom, so we can easily send welcome messages to users and ask them questions right from the Intercom messenger. Our marketing team has even decided to extend our free trial for users impacted by Covid-19 as long as they're willing to answer 3 key questions. It would go something like this: 

 

“We can extend your Chromabill Trial for an additional two months so you can focus on getting back on your feet. The only thing we ask for in return is your time. May I ask you three quick survey questions? It would benefit our company greatly.” 

  • How did you find our app?
    What do you love?
    What can be improved?

 

Additionally, Intercom has rules that we can implement for our messaging. We will have tags on users who will be inching closer to the end of their expiration date for their free trial so that we can send them this targeted messaging for any user tagged "Trial Expiring":

screen_shot_2020-06-23_at_1.48.04_am.png

 

Thanks for sharing the links to some attribution reporting companies. I think Bizible is only for B2B, but I'll research into the kind of attribution Google Analytics can offer. Apple's recent announcement during WWDC emphasized privacy so it's going to be harder for app developers to subtly get as much data on our users as possible starting in Fall 2020.  

 

3. This was extremely insightful. One thing our target market loves is instant gratification so if they can earn points and redeem it for an Amazon card, for example, I feel like that would be a lot more beneficial for them than just free months of service! We're focusing mostly on retention when we launch so we can keep our retention as high as possible instead of focusing on just growth.  The probability of selling our app to new prospects is 5-20%, meanwhile, the probability of selling our service to an existing customer is 60-70%. So it’s clear to see that it’s far easier to keep our loyal users than acquire new users, so I think it's extremely important for our team to start building out a good rewards/advocacy program.

 

Thank you for sharing the links and the article you wrote. Like you said in the article, we want our customers to be our brand ambassadors and promote our products and the best way we can do that is to remain customer focused throughout every experience. That is pretty crazy that you were able to conduct a survey with 731 participants!! How were you able to get so many willing participants? I would love to have that kind of number for my customer interviews, haha. Also, I totally didn't expect that these personalities, including Educators/Validators, would be interested in a cash incentive, but your graph proved me wrong! It's clear that most people would much rather take a thank you letter and cash incentives over new features or content from the brand. 

 

 

Screen Shot 2020-06-23 at 3.13.42 PM.png

How can I determine which personality my current customers will fall under? Is there a way to do so without having to survey them? For example, if (without having to survey them) the majority of my users are in the collaborator personality, then they would obviously want more features as showcased in this chart below. So how can I determine this without turning my app into a focused group? For example, if we were to move away from gift cards and swag and offer other unlockables such as customization of wallpaper, exclusive avatars etc. I would want to understand which personality fit would make sense so we can set up the best rewards system. If we do a welcome survey, do you have any recommendations on what we could ask?  

 

Screen Shot 2020-06-23 at 3.16.06 PM.png

Again, thanks for your time and value! I really appreciate it. 

 

- Tony 

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cpieri
HubSpot Employee

Hi @chromabill 

 

I shared your information with our ad experts and this what they said "Facebook optimizes towards whatever the campaign goal is set to (conversions, clicks, etc.), so in this case men are likely performing better than women as far as the goal. If they want to have a more even split between the two, they can do the previous recommendation of creating a second campaign or ad set and target men in one/women in one and set the budgets evenly"

 

And I think that idea of asking three simple questions to extend the trial is a good one! Never heard of doing that before!

 

As far as how we got so many participants, we were able to work with QuestionPro and one of their providers to source people for the survey. It was across industries and ages so the cost was only about a dollar per survey (it goes up a lot as you get more granular).

 

On the question of how you determine a personality type. We have not found a great way to identify someones personality without asking them directly via a survey. I suppose you may be able to build a complex AI with certain products usage factors but we didn't have those resources! We also only use this process for our advocates as opposed to all customers. So when they request or are invited to join the adovcacy community, this survey will be part of their signup process. These are the specific questions we asked.

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Haelsoft
Member

Amazing. Building Customer Acquisition Strategy and Market Research was a breakthrough for me. I went further to study more about Buyer Persona. Developing the right Buyer Persona. 

 

Thanks for sharing.

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LydiaNicoll
Participant
Hi! Looking forward to the AMA today.

I have these questions:

As a small startup with b2b and b2c products (with the business model being b2b, but needing end-consumer adoption) how do we prioritize activities with limited time and budget to grow both bases simultaneously?

Which tools do you think are valuable for startups to invest in? (Besides HubSpot 😁)

If we are pre-launch with no customers yet, how do we achieve being ‘experts’ on our customers? How can we ensure the assumptions and hypothesis we have are accurate? (We are in pilot phase)

What is the best way to acquire local beta-testers and what are best practices for ensuring conversion/long term usage after the testing phase?

Lydia, ClowID, Malmö, Sweden
cpieri
HubSpot Employee

Hey @LydiaNicoll!

 

1. So I want to make sure I'm understanding clowID - businesses will pay a subscription to use the product, but ultimately customers will need to download the app (for free?) in order to leverage the product, view their receipts, etc? As such, the model becomes more and more useful as more people and businesses adopt clowID? If that is the case, I've often found that these brands find success by locating a local chain in a certain area that will be willing to beta-test the product and encourage their loyal customer base to adopt it. As such, at the beginning, much of the effort is spent on getting the B2B side on board as this is critical in order for the B2C folks to find value. This a generalization however, if I understand your situation a bit more I may be able to get more sepcific. 

 

2. We typically recommend investing in AWS (if you qualify for the AWS Activate program that is even better!) for web-hosting, Google products for team comms (sheets, forms, gmail, etc), and Google Analytics for tracking purposes. Another tool that I really love and I think helps startups tremendously improve their website experience is HotJar.

 

3. If you are still pre-launch, the best recommendation I can make is to identify who you think your target customer may be and find a group of beta-testers (more on that shortly) who are willing to use your product and provide feedback on it throughout its development. Many times I have worked with startups who develop their entire product in a bubble and by the time they bring it to market they find that it does not align with customer expectations and has to be changed dramatically to fit the need.

 

4. Finding local beta-testers can be tricky. Most startup leverage their friends & family networks at the beginning to source these testers. However, you can also take other actions such as posting on reddit, or beta-testing sites. Here is an article I find to be pretty good when thinking about acquiring beta testers. Since your product can also involve in-person point of sales systems you may also find value in trying to source beta testers in local businesses / chains. As far as converting them to long-term customers, I think you might find some value in seeing Kieran and Omer's answer to this question at about 2 minutes in the AMA recording here from last week (under "Attract" and then the "Ask Me Anything Recording" tab

 

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