Why does a pillar page need to be a landing page

SOLVE
Highlighted
Regular Contributor

I've seen some resources online, from both Hubspot and elsewhere, that suggest pillar pages must be landing pages, not blog posts.

 

I want to repurpose and update an older page as my pillar page, since it already ranks fairly well for the topic. But it's a regular web page, not a landing page.

 

1. Is it absolutely necessary that all pillar pages be landing pages in Hubspot?

 

2. If so, is there anyway I can take advantage of the SEO value accrued with the older, more authoritative webpage (e.g. 301 redirecting from that page to the new pillar page)?

Reply
0 Upvotes
2 Accepted solutions

Accepted Solutions
Community Thought Leader | Diamond Partner

Hi @JohnNiggl

 

Pillar pages can be any type of content. What matters is that the content meets the requirements of a pillar page, i.e. covering a broad, relevant topic comprehensively, not what format it was in originally. 

 

For some, un-gating an ebook is the easiest way to quickly create a pillar page. This obviously replaces a landing page and some like to retain the conversion capability, meaning keeping it as a landing page. But it is not a necessity. 

 

Your pillar page can come from anywhere - it can be an existing web page, an un-gated ebook, repurposed blog post or completely original content. 

 

Hope this helps.

Phil Vallender | Inbound marketing for B2B technology companies
Top Contributor | Gold Partner

HI @JohnNiggl,

 

I wrote the resource you referenced, so I wanted to share some thoughts.

 

I probably shouldn't have been so definitive when I said that pillar content should live at the top-level of your website. It helps, but it's not a requirement.

 

The idea behind that guidance is that by linking to your pillar page from your primary navigation, you would be able to give the page slightly more visibiilty to your readers, and more weight to the page for search engines. Since pillar pages often cover topics that are closely aligned to your brand and overall strategy, it may make sense to link to the page from your top-level navigation.

 

You can easily have pillar content in the form of a blog post that lives in a /blog/ subdirectory and still do quite well as long as the content is good and that page is still well linked to both internally and externally.

 

Sean

4 Replies 4
Community Thought Leader | Diamond Partner

Hi @JohnNiggl

 

Pillar pages can be any type of content. What matters is that the content meets the requirements of a pillar page, i.e. covering a broad, relevant topic comprehensively, not what format it was in originally. 

 

For some, un-gating an ebook is the easiest way to quickly create a pillar page. This obviously replaces a landing page and some like to retain the conversion capability, meaning keeping it as a landing page. But it is not a necessity. 

 

Your pillar page can come from anywhere - it can be an existing web page, an un-gated ebook, repurposed blog post or completely original content. 

 

Hope this helps.

Phil Vallender | Inbound marketing for B2B technology companies
Regular Contributor

Hi @Phil_Vallender,

 

Thanks for your message. Our plan was to ungate an existing eBook offer and move the content to the pillar page, while still offering readers the chance to download it in PDF form by submitting the form on the existing landing page.

 

My concern with using the our existing webpage (which is already authoritative on the topic), is that it's not a top-level page. According to at least one source "Pillar pages are a part of the main, top-level navigation on a website. This makes it easy for your website visitors to find the pillar page, and does not hide the resource under multiple layers or clicks."

 

The webpage in question on our site that we'd like to repurpose as the pillar page is 2 layers in, rather than top-level. Do you see that being an issue?

Reply
0 Upvotes
Top Contributor | Gold Partner

HI @JohnNiggl,

 

I wrote the resource you referenced, so I wanted to share some thoughts.

 

I probably shouldn't have been so definitive when I said that pillar content should live at the top-level of your website. It helps, but it's not a requirement.

 

The idea behind that guidance is that by linking to your pillar page from your primary navigation, you would be able to give the page slightly more visibiilty to your readers, and more weight to the page for search engines. Since pillar pages often cover topics that are closely aligned to your brand and overall strategy, it may make sense to link to the page from your top-level navigation.

 

You can easily have pillar content in the form of a blog post that lives in a /blog/ subdirectory and still do quite well as long as the content is good and that page is still well linked to both internally and externally.

 

Sean

Regular Contributor

Hi @SeanHenri - We assumed that and published our pillar page a couple layers down from top. It's worked out well for us.

 

Thanks for clarifying and for writing that helpful article I linked to.

Reply
0 Upvotes