Referencing blog postings posted outside Hubspot

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What is the current best practice for reposting blogs on Hubspot that we originally posted elsewhere?

 

For example, we have a post that we originally posted on LinkedIn. I have reposted that blog to our Hubspot blog (copy and paste) and also added a hyperlink and a note to the original LinkedIn posting at the top of the Hubspot post. Is this the correct and recommended way of doing this?

 

Or should this all be done with redirects?

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"Redirects." Wait. What?

Maybe others will, but we can't think of any reason to redirect TO a LinkedIn post FROM a self-referencing canonicalized HubSpot post.

 

++

Google-Search-Console-Consolidate-duplicate-URLs.pngGoogle Search Console: Consolidate Duplicate URLs

 

Typically, we recommend our clients post to their HubSpot blogs FIRST. That way, Google has a chance to index the HubSpot content canonicalized as the original source of truth FIRST. LinkedIn doesn't permit the use of rel=canonical tags in posts, so ... unlike some other sites -- e.g., Medium -- you can't tell LinkedIn that the original source for the post should be your site. HubSpot handles this on blog posts by default.


Furthermore, in the wild, we've seen Google SERPS vary widely from post-to-post with regard to reposted content. AND, it's becoming harder and harder to discern precisely what that means in each case because SERPS have become increasingly more user-specific -- meaning two people performing the exact same search from the exact same IP address may see different search results based on their unique search history.


Again, best practice when duplicating your content on the web is to ...
- post on your site FIRST and define a canonical page for similar or duplicate pages

- then resubmit your sitemap in Search Console
- then confirm Google updated their index
- then re-post elsewhere as desired


That being said, in the case of LinkedIn, their domain authority is so high that it's STILL possible that your duplicate LinkedIn content will rank higher in Google than the original source. Not a 'problem' as long as you're aware of this and produce your content accordingly -- i.e., include links to your site in all LinkedIn posts even though all links in LinkedIn posts are 'nofollow'!


Canonicalization is an intermediate-to-advanced SEO topic, so ... not to worry if it's a little confusing.

 

Just remember, if you 'own' the duplicated content the original source should be your web property. Not LinkedIn (or anywhere else for that matter).


Hope that helps some.

 

Help answer your question? If so, remember to accept this solution now.

 

Best,
Frank

Chief HubSpot Consultant


hubspot-solutions-signature-mfrankjohnson-v05.png

MFrankJohnson.com | Perfecting HubSpot Series | Connect on LinkedIn

Help find posts quickly ... accept this solution now.

Hope that helps.

 

Best,
Frank

 

MFrankJohnson-dot-com-HubSpot-Community-banner-gif-v20190817

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Community Thought Leader

"Redirects." Wait. What?

Maybe others will, but we can't think of any reason to redirect TO a LinkedIn post FROM a self-referencing canonicalized HubSpot post.

 

++

Google-Search-Console-Consolidate-duplicate-URLs.pngGoogle Search Console: Consolidate Duplicate URLs

 

Typically, we recommend our clients post to their HubSpot blogs FIRST. That way, Google has a chance to index the HubSpot content canonicalized as the original source of truth FIRST. LinkedIn doesn't permit the use of rel=canonical tags in posts, so ... unlike some other sites -- e.g., Medium -- you can't tell LinkedIn that the original source for the post should be your site. HubSpot handles this on blog posts by default.


Furthermore, in the wild, we've seen Google SERPS vary widely from post-to-post with regard to reposted content. AND, it's becoming harder and harder to discern precisely what that means in each case because SERPS have become increasingly more user-specific -- meaning two people performing the exact same search from the exact same IP address may see different search results based on their unique search history.


Again, best practice when duplicating your content on the web is to ...
- post on your site FIRST and define a canonical page for similar or duplicate pages

- then resubmit your sitemap in Search Console
- then confirm Google updated their index
- then re-post elsewhere as desired


That being said, in the case of LinkedIn, their domain authority is so high that it's STILL possible that your duplicate LinkedIn content will rank higher in Google than the original source. Not a 'problem' as long as you're aware of this and produce your content accordingly -- i.e., include links to your site in all LinkedIn posts even though all links in LinkedIn posts are 'nofollow'!


Canonicalization is an intermediate-to-advanced SEO topic, so ... not to worry if it's a little confusing.

 

Just remember, if you 'own' the duplicated content the original source should be your web property. Not LinkedIn (or anywhere else for that matter).


Hope that helps some.

 

Help answer your question? If so, remember to accept this solution now.

 

Best,
Frank

Chief HubSpot Consultant


hubspot-solutions-signature-mfrankjohnson-v05.png

MFrankJohnson.com | Perfecting HubSpot Series | Connect on LinkedIn

Help find posts quickly ... accept this solution now.

Hope that helps.

 

Best,
Frank

 

MFrankJohnson-dot-com-HubSpot-Community-banner-gif-v20190817

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