[Now Closed] AMA: Channing Ferrer, SVP Sales Strategy & Operations

maggiebutler
HubSpot Moderator

HubSpot's SVP of Sales Strategy and Operations, Channing Ferrer, hosted a webinar in August 2020 focused on sharing the lessons he's learned designing sales teams. Click here to get the recording, or click here for the slides.

 

The Q&A with Channing below is now closed. Check out the thread for answers to questions like:

  •  What are the top 3 attributes or skills you hire for? 
  • How do you balance Sales & Account Management roles?
  • What were the greatest win and greatest lessons learned from experiments you ran?
  • My question is how have trained or incentivized Sales members to enter the data they need into HubSpot?

 

 

67 Replies 67
jeyso10
Member

How did you learn how to do Sales Operations? How do you 'break into' departments like that?

Channing-Ferrer
HubSpot Employee

@jeyso10 wrote:

How did you learn how to do Sales Operations? How do you 'break into' departments like that?


@jeyso10 I stumbled into it, but I think this happened because of my approach to sales. I was a sales leader first, but asked to help lead sales ops. I had always taken a very analytical approach to selling and customer engagements. This helped me to transition easily into sales ops. I believe you can be a very effective sales leader by leveraging data, this is the same thinking that sales ops leaders have. If you are already a sales leader then I suggest leaning into your analytical skills and leverage data to drive decisions. If your an individual contributor then you can do the same thing, but through your role (e.g. as a rep, look at your total interactions, total leads, conversion rates etc). In addition to these recommendations, take some SQL classes. Strong data analytical skills are more and more important for sales ops. Learning SQL will help you leverage data insight tools like Looker, Tableau etc.I stumbled into it, but I think this happened because of my approach to sales. I was a sales leader first, but asked to help lead sales ops. I had always taken a very analytical approach to selling and customer engagements. This helped me to transition easily into sales ops. I believe you can be a very effective sales leader by leveraging data, this is the same thinking that sales ops leaders have. If you are already a sales leader then I suggest leaning into your analytical skills and leverage data to drive decisions. If your an individual contributor then you can do the same thing, but through your role (e.g. as a rep, look at your total interactions, total leads, conversion rates etc). In addition to these recommendations, take some SQL classes. Strong data analytical skills are more and more important for sales ops. Learning SQL will help you leverage data insight tools like Looker, Tableau etc.

0 Upvotes
amanda_p
Participant

Related to the tools question you already answered, how involved are you in choosing the tools your teams use? Wondering if that decision lives in Sales Ops as the ops team or somewhere else

Channing-Ferrer
HubSpot Employee

@amanda_p wrote:

Related to the tools question you already answered, how involved are you in choosing the tools your teams use? Wondering if that decision lives in Sales Ops as the ops team or somewhere else


@amanda_p These decisions live on my team and I am very involved. I feel strongly that we should be reguarly evaluating software tools. We are always looking for ways to improve efficiency for both Ops team and sales reps.

0 Upvotes
DFarringtonTN
Member

Thanks for the Lessons Learned presentation. Do you think COVID has changed the way you are approaching your operations work or maybe your team culture and if so how? 

Channing-Ferrer
HubSpot Employee

@DFarringtonTN wrote:

Thanks for the Lessons Learned presentation. Do you think COVID has changed the way you are approaching your operations work or maybe your team culture and if so how? 


@DFarringtonTN Yes it has. I had previously thought that we needed team members that sit nearby one-another. However, now I am learning how the team can operate effectively in a remote environment. This change has recently led me to make several remote hires and change my approach to remote work. This change has expanded my available pool of ops team members. My team has taken to remote work and a remote team and we are all working well together.

0 Upvotes
walterw
Contributor

How long should an BDR be in their role before they graduate? I used to work somewhere where the rule was 1 year at least.

0 Upvotes
Channing-Ferrer
HubSpot Employee

@walterw wrote:

How long should an BDR be in their role before they graduate? I used to work somewhere where the rule was 1 year at least.


@walterw We typically see BDRs in role for about 12-18 months. Less than 12 months in the BDR role is doable, but can be problematic for a few reasons: 1) Career development - BDRs need to go through a series of learning steps so they can become a productive rep. These learning steps need to be spaced out and programmatic. 2) Pipeline generation challenges - BDR pipeline typically takes longer to mature. Thus, if a BDR is in role for a short period of time it puts your pipeline generation at risk and 3) Rep - BDR relationships - the most efficienct BDR has a strong BDR - rep relationship. The rep and BDR need to learn how to work together. Once they do, they become a much more efficient team.

0 Upvotes